Business problems? Don’t Worry, Be Happy!

If you’re ever feeling a little depressed or unhappy, try listening to a song called “Optimistic” by Sounds of Blackness (look it up on You Tube); it does exactly what it says on the tin.

 

I was listening to the song the recently and pondering on the nature of optimism.  The “glass half full or half empty” scenario perfectly illustrates the power of mental attitude; the same level of liquid in the glass can evoke a strong positive or negative reaction depending on your point of view – and may ultimately decide what you do with the contents of the glass.

 

And so it is with the economy.  More educated people than I can explain the intricacies of Keynesian versus Monetary economics (don’t ask), but at a basic level, I believe the economy operates mainly on the current level of optimism present in society.  The reality is that money doesn’t simply disappear in a recession. In fact the total amount of money in circulation tends to remain relatively stable, apart from in extreme circumstances when special measures such as “quantitative easing” – basically printing more money – are introduced.

 

be happy The key is what is happening to the money. The meditation and self-improvement guru Deepak Chopra, when asked about his attitude to money, said; “It’s like blood – you have to keep it flowing” and this is what drives economic growth – or lack of.  In a boom period, people are confident that they will keep their jobs (or get better ones), or are keen to start businesses, so they borrow money and spend their wages on goods and services.  And if people are spending, this means that businesses are selling their goods and services, so they are making profits, which means they can invest in growth, recruit new staff, etc.

 

Conversely, in difficult times, lack of optimism or fear of the future means that people will stop spending money and reduce their levels of borrowing, so businesses sell less and are unable to grow, or may struggle to stay afloat. They have less money to invest and a lower capability to borrow; money stops flowing and everything grinds to a halt.

 

The whole issue of the level of optimism in society is being highlighted both by Government activity and the news that the banks – who largely got us into this mess in the first place – are now thriving again.  Despite the return of big profits – and bumper bonuses  – for banks, lending to business remains low and businesses are still complaining that they cannot get good access to business finance.  However, the banks all state that they have plenty of money available for business loans. The problem seems to be two-fold; on the one hand, fewer businesses are applying for loans, simply because they are pessimistic about their future prospects and secondly, those who are seeking finance are finding that the banks are making their lending criteria much stricter.

 

The recent lack of business willingness to borrow is a bad sign – an indication of lack of optimism.  And it’s particularly bad for a coalition Government that is placing its faith in the private sector to lead us out of our economic problems. But the Government itself is a big part of the problem; its attempts to manage expectations by continually reminding us of all our financial worries, together with its short-term “slash and burn” strategy of making swingeing cuts where possible, are creating a depressing fog of negativity in society that many experts are predicting will destroy the fragile recovery and lead to a “double-dip” recession.

 

With the disappearance of the Regional Development Agencies (including Advantage West Midlands) and the Business Link national business support network, leaving behind a very messy and unco-ordinated business support sector, tangible help and guidance for small and medium sized business seems to be in short supply; which is worrying since SMEs employ over 56% of the workforce (over 12 million people).

 

Cutting costs are only ever one part of the equation – there also has to be significant investment in the drivers of growth.  A sustained recovery will only take place when people start to feel confident enough to set up new businesses and existing businesses begin to access finance and investment once again.  After several years, optimism is starting to return to the economy, but we are waiting with baited breath to see what the Government’s future strategy will be for creating a little more optimism within the business sector.

 

Watch this space…

(Original version of this article was printed in The Vine magazine, September, 2010)

Free Selling to the Public Sector Seminar, 4th December 2013

We had a great time at the last Selling to the Public Sector seminar  in Leicester on 14th November – excellent and really informative input from our guest from the Procurement Dept at Leciester City Council, a wonderful meal provided by our guests at Shimla Pinks and some really good networking.

The next event will be held on Wednesday 4th December, 2013 at Phoenix Centre.  At this seminar we will be focusing on:

  • Hints and Tips for Finding Great Procurement Opportunities
  • Overview on the Preparation of a Competitive Tender

And, as an added bonus, there will be a special Q&A session with some buyers from Leicester City Council.

As always, food and refreshments will be provided and there will be the opportunity to network with fellow businesses and the opportunity to register to attend further events in December or January.

 

These events are exclusively available to Leicester based businesses, as part of the city council’s initiative to help local businesses to win more business from Public Sector organisations. They are free to attend, but places are limited and will be allocated strictly on a “first come, first served” basis, so please email info@mustardplus.com as soon as possible in order to reserve your place.

If you require further information or would like to invite additional Leicester City based businesses to attend alongside you, then please call us on 07815 106461 to discuss.

Venue: Phoenix Square, Phoenix Arts Centre, 4 Midland Street, Leicester LE1 1TG.

Start Time: 6.00pm

 

TO BOOK A PLACE:

EMAIL: info@mustardplus.com

TEL: 07815 106461

Invitation Details Here

4th November 2013 – The Next Selling to the Public Sector Seminar

The Selling to the Public Sector programme for small, local businesses and social enterprises in Leicester continues to roll on…

On Wednesday 30th October, 2013, we delivered some presentations giving an overview of public sector procurement, signposting to further (free) online procurement training and giving some tips on how to get through the Pre-Qualification Questionnaire stage.

The next event will be held on Thursday 14th November, 2013 at Shimla Pinks restaurant.  At this seminar we will be focusing on:

  • The Challenges and Barriers to Procurment – and how to overcome them
  • Hints and Tips for Writing a Winning Tender

And, as an added bonus, there will be a special Q&A session with some buyers from Leicester City Council.

As always, food and refreshments will be provided and there will be the opportunity to network with fellow businesses and the opportunity to register to attend further events in November, December or January.

 

These events are exclusively available to Leicester based businesses, as part of the city council’s initiative to help local businesses to win more business from Public Sector organisations. They are free to attend, but places are limited and will be allocated strictly on a “first come, first served” basis, so please email info@mustardplus.com as soon as possible in order to reserve your place.

If you require further information or would like to invite additional Leicester City based businesses to attend alongside you, then please call us on 07815 106461 to discuss.

Venue: Shimla Pinks Restaurant, 65-69 London Road, Leicester, LE2 0PE

Start Time: 6.00pm

 

TO BOOK A PLACE:

EMAIL: info@mustardplus.com

TEL: 07815 106461

 

More Procurement Training for Leicester Businesses

After 2 successful events at the Chutney Ivy restaurant, the next FREE “Selling to the Public Sector” presentation & networking evening will be taking place at Phoenix Square on Wednesday 30th October, 2013.

The businesses attending will receive:

Information, tips and guidance on how to win Public Sector contracts, from Kul Sanghera & Michael Barrows of Mustard Plus Ltd. Kul & Michael both have substantial expertise in delivering tendering and procurement support services to public and private sector businesses. They also have many years of tender development, bid writing & bid marking experience.
• Networking opportunities with other local businesses.

• Food and refreshments
• Individual business advice & guidance following the event
• An opportunity to register to attend a range of further events in November, December or January.

The event will be held on:

• Wednesday 30th October – from 6pm

These events are exclusively available to Leicester based businesses, as part of the city council’s initiative to help local businesses to win more business from Public Sector organisations. They are free to attend, but places are limited and will be allocated strictly on a “first come, first served” basis, so please email info@mustardplus.com as soon as possible in order to reserve your place.

If you require further information or would like to invite additional Leicester City based businesses to attend alongside you, then please call us on 07815 106461 to discuss.

Venue: Phoenix Square, 4 Midland Street, Leicester, LE1 1TG

 

 

TO BOOK A PLACE:

EMAIL: info@mustardplus.com

TEL: 07815 106461

 

Free Procurement Support for Leicester Businesses

We are delighted to invite Leicester-based SMES and Social Enterprises to join us at Chutney Ivy Indian Restaurant, for a FREE “Selling to the Public Sector” presentation & networking evening.

The businesses attending will receive:

Information, tips and guidance on how to win Public Sector contracts, from Kul Sanghera & Michael Barrows of Mustard Plus Ltd. Kul & Michael both have substantial expertise in delivering tendering and procurement support services to public and private sector businesses. They also have many years of tender development, bid writing & bid marking experience.
• Networking opportunities with other local businesses.

• Free starter, main course & drink
• Individual business advice & guidance following the event
• An opportunity to register to attend a range of further events in November, December or January.
• Bonus feature of a bite-sized introduction to mobile marketing techniques

The events will be held on:

• Wednesday 2nd October – from 6pm
• Thursday 17th October – from 6pm

These events are exclusively available to Leicester based businesses, as part of the city council’s initiative to help local businesses to win more business from Public Sector organisations. They are free to attend, but places are limited and will be allocated strictly on a “first come, first served” basis, so please email info@mustardplus.com as soon as possible in order to reserve your place.

If you require further information or would like to invite additional Leicester City based businesses to attend alongside you, then please call us on 07815 106461 to discuss.

Venue: Chutney Ivy Indian Restaurant, 41 Halford Street, Leicester. LE1 1TR

As well as free street parking, there is a multi-storey NCP car park across the road (next to the Curve Theatre). Where the restaurant is able to give you a discount card which reduces the cost of parking.

 

TO BOOK A PLACE:

EMAIL: info@mustardplus.com

TEL: 07815 106461

 

“We’re All Doomed!” Ark-Building Lessons For Business

 

The one thing certain about any business is…sometime in the future it will no longer be trading…

 

business survivalIf you own a business, are in the process of starting one, or even if you are just thinking about setting up a new venture, I’m sorry to bring you such bad news.  But it’s true, your business is guaranteed to fail in some way, at some time.  It doesn’t matter if you are a sole trader, or the CEO of a well-established multi-billion dollar global organisation – sorry but you’re doomed! For example, the US bank Lehman Brothers, became the largest ever corporate bankruptcy ($691 billion) in September 2008, after nearly 160 years of trading.  And the F.W. Woolworth brand disappeared from the UK high street at the beginning of 2009 – 140 years after the company was first founded in the US in 1879.

 

Think about it – even global brand names like Microsoft, Coca Cola and McDonald’s will eventually disappear from our collective consciousness – probably to become major attractions in the world’s museums.  Luckily for you junk food addicts and computer nerds, the likelihood is that it probably won’t happen for many, many decades – but you never know.

 

It sounds depressing, but it’s actually quite logical if you think about it; even if you have a thriving business, you will eventually want to sell it, or you will die or retire and – unless you have a proper succession plan in place, the business may die with you, or it may get sold and changed or absorbed into a completely new business, or it may even get sold, broken up and the assets re-sold or re-used.  And of course, if your business is not successful, then your future is probably already mapped out – don’t forget that 80% of businesses fail within the first 2 years of trading.

 

The good news is – assuming you make it past the first 2 years – if your business is doing reasonably well, or even just surviving, knowing that it has a limited lifespan means that you can make plans for what will happen at the end. In fact many business experts advise that you should always start a business knowing exactly what your exit strategy from it will be. Venture Capitalists have turned this philosophy into an extremely successful business model, investing in promising businesses on (usually) a 3-5 year timeline, on the basis that they will be able to sell their holding at a much higher price at the end of the period.

 

Succession planning always comes up as one of the main issues in surveys of small business owners and I personally know of a couple of good, well-established small businesses that have disappeared simply because the owners were unable to pass them on to someone else.  The Asian community in the UK in particular is experiencing a sea change in business ownership patterns simply because the children of corner shop owners are unwilling to take on the responsibilities and sacrifice required to keep these businesses operational.

 

Exit strategies and succession planning are therefore extremely important – but (obviously) of more pressing concern is to ensure that you have a thriving, successful business to exit from.  When things are going well, the old adage, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” tends to kick in.  As most football managers will tell you, it’s usually best not to change a winning team.  Unfortunately however, in the world of business, an attitude like this could lead to your business disappearing down the tubes…

 

The truth is “If it ain’t broke, it probably will be soon.”  Pressure from new technology, market shifts, new competition and changes in customer behaviour mean that the business landscape is ever-changing and businesses need to adapt accordingly.  Even Long-established, thriving businesses like Lehman Brothers can get wiped out by extremely disruptive economic events – and I wonder how many vinyl record (remember them?) pressing plants, cassette tape manufacturers and 35mm film processing services have vanished over the last few decades.

 

Long term business success demands that you keep monitoring your business and improving and adapting it to internal and external changes.  As Andy Grove, head of computer chip maker Intel – one of the world’s most successful companies – says, “Only the paranoid survive.”  Just being “good enough” is NOT good enough. Ask yourself how you can get better, or, for example, adapt your business to new behaviours such as increased Internet and mobile usage.

 

Marketing experts use the theory of the Product Lifecycle to explain the natural lifespan of products and businesses.  By introducing new products/services and/or adapting existing ones to extend their lifespan, you will be able to ensure the longevity of your business – and sometimes this can lead to spectacular success; Lucozade was first introduced in the UK in 1927 and for many decades was sold as an aid to recovery from sickness. Sales eventually started to dwindle as it became synonymous will illness and infirmity. However, in the early 1980’s it was rebranded as an energy drink, in response to the gowning health and fitness craze. The result? Between 1984 and 1989, the value of UK sales of the drink reportedly tripled to almost $115 million!

 

(Original version of this article was first published in The Vine, August 2010)

Tough Talk and Survival Strategies for Hard Times

When the new Government of many colours took over in 2010, watching Prime Minister David Cameron and his Deputy Nick Clegg really made me smile – it was a bit like watching a smart, confident, know-it-all kid and his earnest, eager-to-please younger brother.   One journalist even suggested that they should always david cameron and nick cleggstand in the same order on screen – like Ant and Dec – so that we could always tell them apart.  An amusing thought, but also quite apt; despite the surface-level difference in their political viewpoints, both are from similar backgrounds – products of the ‘ruling class’ output of public school and Oxbridge.  Under the surface they have a lot more in common than we think – which has contributed to the success of the partnership between their respective parties.

 

Anyway, Ant and Dec – sorry, Dave and Nick,  soon adopted a tough-talking, media-friendly ‘let’s get down to business’ attitude.  The first order of business was to announce an immediate programme of £6 billion worth of spending cuts.  Coincidently, this is the same amount of money that BP contributes in taxes to the Treasury – when it’s not busy destroying the Gulf Coast of America with oil…

 

ant and decCameron spent a lot of time driving home the message of how bad things are, explaining that extremely drastic measures would be necessary  – and even trying to set an example by making his ministers take pay cuts and get rid of their ministerial cars.  It’s a standard political tactic of new Governments in difficult times; keep emphasising the problems and keep blaming the old regime, so that you have a readymade excuse to introduce tough, unpopular policies and you can take the credit when things start to improve.  I have always had  2 serious issues with Cameron’s strategy though:

 

1. Being honest is one thing, but economic growth is driven by generating confidence and optimism so that people go out and start spending money, banks start to make loans and businesses start to invest.  Beating people over the head with such a pessimistic message about the state of the economy will have the opposite effect – as we have seen in the last couple of years.  We already know times are hard – tell us something positive about how we can improve matters.

 

2. Ordinarily, the idea of the “management team” setting an example by accepting pay cuts and tightening their belts is one that I would support.  But this gesture becomes completely empty when you discover that 23 out of the 29 Cabinet members are millionaires.  Hard times indeed – but certainly not for members of the Government, even with a pay cut.

 

But despite the Government’s unrelenting message of doom and gloom, business has still had to try to survive and even thrive during this period.  But what things do businesses need to do in order to get through the next few years?  If we look at the 3 main areas – finance, operations and marketing – we can break it down to some key strategies:

 

Finance

 

·         Cut your costs:Look for savings throughout your business – you will be surprised how many you can find. Do you turn equipment off at night? Is every business journey essential?  Are your suppliers giving you the best prices?

 

·         Credit check new customers:  one major customer going bust could kill your business.  Protect yourself by conducting rigorous credit checks on new customers and agreeing clear terms up front.

 

·         Manage your cashflow:Listen to whatyour finances are telling you. Issue invoices promptly and chase up debtors; Avoid overstocking; negotiate longer credit terms with suppliers; shorter ones for customers; and keep talking to your bank.

 

 

Operations:

 

·         Streamline your operation: Consider moving to smaller premises, or sub-letting unused space.  Sell off excess equipment and review staffing levels.  Will flexible working be more cost-efficient?  Are redundancies necessary – or desirable? 

 

·         Stick to the knitting:Concentrate on products and services that sell, don’t put all your efforts into trying to sell untried/unproven products, stick to profitable favourites.

·         Train your staff: Don’t be tempted to scrap your training plans; your staff are one of your greatest assets and will be the key to the long-term success of the business.

 

 

Marketing:

 

·         Increase your marketing: Don’t make the classic mistake of most businesses – when competing for a smaller pot of money, it’s even more important to tell people why they should come to you.

·         Keep your customers: In uncertain times, consumers cut their discretionary spending, so do all you can to keep your customers coming back. Discounts, loyalty schemes and regular communication are some ways of letting your customers know you value them.

 

·         Provide outstanding customer service: Consumers appreciate businesses that try harder, especially in tough times.  Efficient service, fast delivery, flexible payment terms, etc can persuade people to spend with you rather than a competitor.

 

·         Sell online: An online sales or marketing channel will expose you to a larger marketplace for minimal cost.

 

Above all, stay positive!  If you want your business to survive – to mix a couple of metaphors – stop crying over spilt milk and remember the glass is still half full.

(Original version of this article was printed in the Vine Magazine in July 201o)

I Vote For…New Staff

After the General Election in May 2010, a new – and very confusing – political era dawned, with the British public announcing that it was not particularly convinced by any of the parties.

 

As we know, this election made history in being the first to feature a series of televised debates between the main candidates.  Along with the rest of the country, I tuned into the first debate with great curiosity and watched with a significantly increased level of admiration for the “young upstart” Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg as he completely overshadowed the two main protagonists, David Cameron and Gordon Brown.

 

recruiting staffI fully identified with the surge in support the Lib Dems received after that first debate.  Clegg’s engaging performance highlighted the lack of any specific policy statements from Cameron, who seemed to hide behind a vague, washed-out version of the “change” message, so powerfully delivered by Barack Obama during his election campaign.  This, together with Brown’s lack of media-friendliness and endless capacity for self-destruction, made me begin to question my traditional political leanings – especially since my favourite colour is yellow!

 

It all ended quite strangely for Clegg; due to the vagaries of our voting system, the LDs gained more votes and a bigger share of the vote than before, yet finished with fewer seats!  And even more strangely, despite having fewer seats, they are now in a much more powerful position than in the previous parliament.

 

I admit that my interest in the second and third debates was curtailed by much more urgent matters – the live football matches on another channel!  The small pangs of guilt I felt about abandoning my involvement in the democratic process quickly evaporated each time I flicked back to the debates to hear the protagonists saying roughly the same things they had said in the previous weeks, albeit in slightly different ways and in answer to completely different questions!

 

The overall winner from the debates was probably Nick Clegg, but the true validity of the debates is still in question.   Some commentators called this an X-Factor style election, but that’s a lazy – and inaccurate – description.  In the X-Factor, the candidates demonstrate their skills upfront and the public and judges make decisions based on the how good we think those skills are.   The only skills demonstrated in the debates were the candidate’s acting abilities…

 

I prefer to think of this as the Big Interview election because, whilst watching the performances, the thing that struck me most is that it was really a glorified job interview – 3 candidates being asked a range of questions in order to prove their suitability for the job role of Prime Minister.

 

As someone who has conducted hundreds of interviews in the past, I found this aspect of the election process worrying, because the most important truth I’ve learned about interviews is that the person who performs best in the interview is by no means guaranteed to be the best person for the job.

 

Having also been on the other side of the desk and failed to get jobs I knew I was ideally suited to, I’m also aware of just how subjective and unreliable the interview process can be.  Psychologists say that an interviewer makes up his/her mind about a candidate within between 5 and 20 seconds – and then spends the rest of the interview subconsciously trying to justify that first impression.

 

The recruiting and interviewing process is fraught with dangers, both because of the natural prejudices of the interviewer and the potentially Oscar-winning acting abilities of candidates.  Apparently 50% of cvs contain “inaccuracies” – basically “lies” – so the problems actually start even before the candidate walks in.   

 

So how do you ensure you recruit the best candidate for the job?  It’s important to prepare very carefully and there are a whole range of potential strategies you can use, so the process can be quite complex, but here are a few simple tips that will help to achieve better results.

 

1. First impressions – be aware of your initial impressions and remember that they will probably be based on something completely irrational and inconsequential.

 

2. Be consistent – prepare a range of standard questions and use them for all candidates. Make sure most questions are directly relevant to the skillsets required for the job.

 

3. Share the load – try to include at least one other person in the interview process, preferably someone who is fully aware of the requirements of the job.

 

4. Be cynical – remember that the candidate is trying to give the best possible impression, so try to look below the surface, especially when analysing cvs.    

 

5. Be nice – there’s nothing to be gained from trying to intimidate candidates.

 

6. Test – try to include tests within the process that help to assess some of the skills required in the job.

 

7. Take up references – always!

 

8. Keep details of any of the failed candidates who impressed you – it may make further recruitment much cheaper and you may need them sooner than you think.

 

And if all else fails, a properly monitored probationary period will quickly weed out poor performers – maybe we should have a similar period for Prime Ministers…

(Original version of this article first published in The Vine magazine, June 2010)

And the Winner Is…

The 2012-13 football season in nearly over, but, at the time of writing, I’m still enjoying a few twists and turns before the dust fully settles. And I still recall the ending of the 2011-12 season – one of the most exciting English Premier League title races for many year!

 

Not being a fan of any of the main protagonists, I can normally relax and just enjoy the drama – except when we are involved in the play-offs like we have been for the last 2 seasons.  For my sins, I’m a Sheffield United supporter – yes, all expressions of sympathy are gratefully accepted, but I remain firm in the principle that you should support your home-town team.  I’ve lost count of the number of glory-hunting Brummie’s I’ve met over the years who, with 2 (3 if you include West Bromwich Albion) good quality teams to choose from, have declared their allegiance to one of  the traditional ‘big-boys’, Manchester United, Liverpool or Arsenal.

 

winnersAs with the vast majority of football fans, being a Blade (a Sheffield United supporter) is to travel in hope rather than expectation, to accept that you will spend your life watching rubbish football and to enjoy brief periods of success in between the endless years of crushing disappointment.   I was at Wembley a few years ago, watching my team in the annual multi-million pound, winner-takes-all, end of season battle to join the Premier League big boys, which is known as the Championship Play-off Final.  Naturally, we were rubbish and – of-course – we lost.  

 

However, one great thing about being a Sheffield United Supporter is the knowledge that it is one of the best-run clubs in the English football league, with good revenues and low levels of debt.  This is particularly important in an industry which is awash with money, but has so many badly-run and failing organisations, that it remains a whisker away from a major crisis.  In the last few seasons we have seen clubs in very single division get into serious financial trouble and go into administration.  A couple of clubs have even gone completely out of business.

 

Whilst in the short-term the failure of a rival business might be a good thing, over the longer term this could be disastrous for the football industry.  This is because professional sport is a slightly unique industry in that each organisation exists only because all the others exist.  A football club can only remain in business and become a thriving, successful organisation if it has a good number of healthy rival clubs to compete against.  Good competition is essential for football – and football clubs – to survive. We have already seen the fallout in the Scottish Premier League arising from the financial problems at Glasgow Rangers.

 

In most other industries, being able to operate as a monopoly – the sole supplier – would be a dream come true for an organisation.  Imagine being the only plumbing supplier in a large city; “Need a new washer in that tap, my dear? No problem –we’ll be able to sort it in a couple of years and it will cost you £1,250…!” The potential for exploitation of customers as a result of the lack of competition is the reason why the independent public body, the Competition Commission, exists. Its remit is to ensure that companies don’t become so large and dominant in their markets that they begin to exert too much influence and start operating to the detriment of their customers.

 

In truth, most businesses are afraid of competition and shy away from it as much as possible.  But actually, competition is very often a good thing, both for a business and for an industry as a whole.  Sometimes, a group of similar businesses competing against each other in a particular area or region leads to that area developing a reputation as the best place to go to find a top supplier in that industry, which brings benefits for all the businesses involved.   Hence the reputation of Saville Row for bespoke tailoring and Harley Street for private medical specialists.

 

Competition is also great for an individual business for several other reasons, for example:

 

1. Studying competitors helps you to work out where/who your potential customers are and how to reach them. Competition validates your ideas – if people are buying similar services to yours, it proves there is a market for your offering.

 

2. Studying your competitors’ offerings helps you to determine which products and services are most successful in the marketplace – and the missing offerings that you may be able to exploit as part of you USP (unique selling point).  Competition forces you to think about what you need to do to differentiate yourself from other suppliers.

 

3.  Analysing the strengths of more established and successful competitors will provide an indication of the improvements necessary for your company to grow successfully. Copy what your competitors do well and improve on the things they do badly.

 

Without competition, a business will become stagnant and lose focus. In business therefore, competition is a necessary evil, so treat it positively.  Study it, learn from it and use it to make your own organisation better – and one day you may even achieve Premier League status.    

(original version of this article first published in The Vine magazine, May 2010)

Mobile Marketing Breakfast Event, Friday 26th April

A Special Breakfast Event at the Signing Tree Conference Centre

 

Internet usage is changimobile marketing seminarng! In 2013, Internet traffic from mobile devices will be greater than from pcs and customers are increasingly performing Internet searches for local suppliers whilst they are on the move. Despite this, few businesses have a proper mobile strategy and most websites are still not mobile-optimised.

The wonderful guys down at the Signing Tree Conference Centre in Birmingham, have  asked me to deliver a short seminar at their next Business Networking Breakfast event.

In this seminar, I will briefly outline the key things every business needs to do to engage more effectively with existing clients and attract new clients by implementing a successful mobile marketing strategy.

 

Date:                     Friday, 26th April 2013

Time:                    7:30am – 9:00am

Where:                 Signing Tree Conference Centre, (based at Deaf Cultural Centre) Ladywood Road, Birmingham, B16 8SZ

 

If you are new to the world of mobile marketing and want to know how it can help you and your business to achieve your targets, then come along and find out with us!

 

This event is free but cost for breakfast, which includes tea/coffee and a breakfast bap is £5. (Payment required in cash on the day)

 

Programme:

 

7:30am – 8:00am              Coffee and networking

8:00am – 8:30am              Guest Speaker Michael Barrows – Matrix Marketing & Management

8:30am – 9:30am              Breakfast & networking

 

To book your place on this event, please contact Sam on telephone  0121 450 5121  or email bookings@signingtree.org.uk

 

If you would like to take a tour of our inspirational conference centre whilst you are here, please talk to Sam from the Conference Centre  Sales Team.

 

We look forward to welcoming you to the Signing Tree!